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(F) Topics that might be covered include, but are not limisted to, such titles as Colonial America, the Early National Period, Industrial America in the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era and World War I, the Period between the World Wars, World War II, the United States since 1945, the Vietnam War, American Economic History, American Constitutional History, African American History, and the American South. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

An intense, analytic study of a major problem or topic in world history. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different.

Hours
3

Designed for teachers with special areas of interest.

Hours
3

(F) An in-depth look at the psychological as well as some social concerns of sport and human performance. Topics include motivation, psyching up, team cohesion, exercise adherence, mental imagery, visualization, and exercise and its ability to postpone the effects of aging. The objective of the course is to enable students to comprehend and apply available information to enhance their effectiveness as teachers and coaches.

Hours
3

(S) Students will learn the rationale behind and the techniques required for various fitness and physiological tests performed in fitness and clinical settings, and the facets of safe and effective exercise programs for improving health and fitness. Prerequisite: WELL 340 or permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: WELL340
Hours
3

(F, S, Sum) Supervised experience in fitness and wellness promotion in a related setting. Students wil have the opportunity to put into practice the knowledge and practical skills they have learned in their class work. Students should take this course in the final year of their studies.

Hours
6

(F, S) As part of the Humanities sequence and the sequel to HIST 110, this course examines the role of religion in the maintenance of Roman, Christian, and Islamic empires, with particular attention to religiously inspired art, architecture, and literature. The course begins with an examination of the rise of the Roman Empire and proceeds to examine the Christian transformation of that empire from Constantine through the Middle Ages. The primary focus is "Christendom" in Western Europe, with limited attention to development in the Byzantine Empire. The rise and spread of Islam is also examined, with special attention given to the interaction between Christian and Muslim civilization. The course ends with examination of forces that challenge the medieval political-religious establishment in Western Europein the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 and HIST 110. Corequisite: ENGL 102.

Prerequisites: ENCO111 and HIST110, or HIST110 and ENCO100, or HIST110 and ENGL100, or HIST110 and ENGL101
Hours
3

(F) Focusing on primary texts in translation as well as on contemporary secondary texts, HUMN 151 enriches students' awareness and understanding on the ideas and aesthetics that help shape the world. Co-requisites: ENGL 101; HIST 110; GNST 100; or permission of faculty.

Corequisites: ENGL101 and HIST110 and GNST100
Hours
1

(S) Focusing on primary texts in English and in translation as well as on contemporary secondary texts, HUMN 152 enriches students' awareness and understanding of the ideas and aesthetics that shaped the world from Ancient to Early Modern times. Pre-requisites: ENGL 101; HIST 110; GNST 100; or equivalent transfer credit. Co-requisites: ENGL 102; HUMN 112; or permission of faculty.

Prerequisites: ENCO111 and HIST110 and GNST100, or ENCO100 and HIST110 and GNST100, or ENCO111 and HIST110 and GNST100, or ENGL101 and HIST110 and GNST100 Corequisites: ENGL102 and HUMN112
Hours
1

(F, S) As part of the Humanities sequence, this course examines Western Culture from the Enlightenment to the 20th Century. This couse focuses on the development of literature and the major trends in art and music. This course includes student papers and presentations. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and HUMN 112. Co-requisite: HUMN 213.

Prerequisites: ENCO112 and HUMN112, or ENGL102 and HUMN112
Hours
3

(F, S)As part of the Humanities sequence, this course begins with an examination of the impact of the religious wars in the 17th Century and the Scientific Revolution on society and culture in Western Europe. Attention then shifts to the political, economic, and ideological causes of revolutions in America and France. The course then examines the Industrial Revolution, the rise of mass society, and their impact on society and culture in Europe and the United States. The course ends with an examination of significant developments in politics and science in the last half of the 19th Century; namely, imperialism, nationalism, and Darwinism. Throughout the course, attention is given to developments in philosophy (particularly political philosophy) and religion during these pivotal periods of history. Requirements include papers and presentations. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and HUMN 112. Corequisite: HUMN 211.

Prerequisites: ENCO112 and HUMN112, or ENGL102 and HUMN112
Hours
3

(F, S) As the final part of the Humanities sequence, this interdisciplinary course focuses on significant developments in western society and culture in the 20th Century. Prerequisite: HUMN 211 and 213 or 27 hours of transfer credit in the humanities, including courses in composition, speech, modern history, modern literature, fine arts, and modern religion or philosophy.

Prerequisites: HUMN211 and HUMN213
Hours
3

(S) As the final part of the Humanities sequence, this interdisciplinary course focuses on significant developments in western society and culture in the 20th Century. Attention is given to developments in philosophy in the 20th century, including but not limited to pragmatism, philosophy of language, and existentialism. Prerequisite: HUMN 211 and 213 or 27 hours of transfer credit in the humanities, including courses in composition, speech, modern history, modern literature, fine arts, and modern religion or philosophy. This course may cross-list with PHIL 215.

Prerequisites: HUMN211 and HUMN213 Prohibited: PHIL215
Hours
3

(F) Focusing on primary texts in English and in translation as well as on contemporary secondary texts, HUMN 251 enriches students' awareness and understanding of the ideas and aesthetics that shaped the world from the Enlightment to the beginnings of modernity. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102; HUMN 112; or equivalent transfer credit. Co-requisites: Humn 211; HUMN 213; or permission of faculty.

Prerequisites: ENCO112 and HUMN112, or ENGL102 and HUMN112 Corequisites: HUMN211 and HUMN213
Hours
1

(S) Focusing n primary texts in English and in translation as well as on contemporary secondary texts, HUMN 252 focuses on an event, author, or idea introduced in a designated section of HUMN 214. Pre-requisites: HUMN 211; HUMN 213; or equivalent transfer credit. Co-requisites: HUMN 214 (designated section); or permission of faculty.

Prerequisites: HUMN211 and HUMN213 Corequisites: HUMN214
Hours
1

(F) A seminar in recent fiction and non-fiction of significant merit. Co-requisites: junior standing or permission of faculty.

Prerequisites: HUMN214
Hours
1

(S) Classic text selected by profesors in the program. Prerequisite: HUMN 351 or permission of faculty.

Prerequisites: HUMN351
Hours
1

(S) The senior "capstone" seminar for History and Religious Studies majors (but any students may take the course).

Hours
3

(F, S)This course is designed to familiarize students with the questions asked by disciplines of the Social Sciences. Thematic in approach, this course will examine common questions as well as the requisite theories and approaches employed by sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, cultural geographers, psychologists, Appalachian Studies scholars, criminal justice specialists, and economists.

Hours
3

(S) Emphasis on the concepts of place, region, spatial interaction, landscape interpretation and landscape evolution. Deals with the graphic media of geography - maps, graphs, scale models. Case studies illustrate geographic principles to familiarize students with various parts of the world. For future teachers as well as students of the natural and social sciences.

Hours
3

(F, S) The purpose of this course is to enhance basic mathematical skills and to prepare students for subsequent mathematics courses. This course is a prerequisite for those who do not qualify for enrollment in MATH 110, MATH 131, or MATH 133. The topics of the course will include, but are not limited to: fractions, decimals, and percents; operations with real numbers, including hierarchy of operations; exponents, roots, and radicals; polynomial arithmetic with emphasis on factoring; solving linear equations and linear inequalities; formula manipulation; and word problems involving any of these topics. The three hours credit for this transitional course counts for fulltime status but not toward graduation requirements.

Prerequisites: Tested out of MATH 099
Hours
3

The purpose of this course is to enhance basic mathematical skills and to prepare students for subsequent mathematics courses. This course is a prerequisite for those who do not qualify for enrollment in Math 110, Math 131, or Math 133. Students entering Union College (any freshman or those transfer students without a transferable mathematics course) with a Math ACT score of 18 or less will be placed in this course. The topics of the course will include, but are not limited to: fractions, decimals, and percents; operations with real numbers, including hierarchy of operations, exponents, roots, and radicals; polynomial arithmetic with emphasis on factoring; solving linear equations and linear inequalities; formula manipulation; and word problems involving any of these topics. This course does not satisfy General Education Requirements in mathematics. This course may not be used to satisfy distributional requirements for any other major program or area.

Hours
3

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