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(on demand) Supervised field experience at an approved health care site. Students will gain experience about the operation of such facilities. A daily journal is required as well as an end-of-term reflection paper on how the intern experience has influenced the student's career plans. The course will be taken on a credit/fail basis only.

Hours
0

(S) A lecture/discussion of selected topics of interest, lead by faculty members of the Department of Natural Sciences, invited speakers, and student participants. May be repeated once; a student can earn a maximum of two credit hours through this course. All natural science majors must take this course at least once. Prerequisite: Natural science major with junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor.

Hours
1

Enrichment and updating elementary and middle grade teachers on selected topics in astronomy, physical science and modern physics. Selected science journal off-prints will be reviewed. The course will include several lecture demonstrations and hands-on experience with laboratory equipment.

Hours
3

A course for middle school and elementary teachers presenting earth science concepts outlined in Kentucky's Program of Studies.

Hours
3

This course for elementary school teachers presents an integrated approach to scientific instruction using fictional children's literature and laboratory activities as its foundations. Students will study the life cycle of organisms, using terraria and aquaria to model habitats and ecosystems.

Hours
3

A course for primary/intermediate teachers of science presenting physical science concepts outlined in Kentucky's Program of Studies and Core Content for Assessment.

Hours
3

A theory which professional geologists once scoffed at has revolutionized earth science in the last decades. In this combination lecture/laboratory course, students will construct models and analyze actual data to reconstruct the historical development of this important theory.

Hours
3

(F, S) A study of Classical and Koine Greek to prepare students for advanced study of Greek philosophy, New Testament, and early Christian theology.

Hours
3

(F, S) A study of Classical and Koine Greek to prepare students for advaced study of Greek philosophy, New Testament, and early Christian theology.

Hours
3

(F, S) A study of basic principles of word formation and grammar in Greek and Latin. Each course may be taken concurrently with GREK 111 or 112, or separately.

Hours
1

(F, S) A study of basic principles of word formation and grammar in Greek and Latin. Each course may be taken as with GREK 111 or 112, or separately.

Hours
1

(F) A continuation of Greek 112 designed to review grammar through translations of primary texts. Prerequisite: GREK 112.

Prerequisites: GREK112
Hours
3

(F, S) A reading and translation course which may be taken with GREK 211 or separately.

Hours
1

(S) Translation of classical and Hellenistic Greek texts. Prerequisite: GREK 211.

Prerequisites: GREK211
Hours
3

A course designed to introduce students to Graduate Study at Union College. Students will complete entrance writing exercise and receive training in MyUnion, webmail and Chalk & Wire electronic portfolio.

Hours
1

A course designed to introduce students to Psychology Graduate Study at Union College. Students will complete entrance writing exercise and receive training in MyUnion and webmail.

Hours
1

(on demand) A study of biblical Hebrew to prepare students for advanced study of the Hebrew Bible.

Hours
3

(F, S) A study of the great civilizations of the ancient world designed to introduce students to the study of history and the historical study of religion. The course focuses on the origins and foundations of the first great civilizations, with special attention to the function of religion in the maintenance of civilization.The Fertile Crescent and eastern Mediterranean are the central focus, with particular attention given to Ancient Israel and Ancient Greece. Other ancient civilizations studied may include those of China, India, and Rome. An overarching topic central to the course is the transition from polytheism to monotheism in the mid-1st millenium BCE, a period commonly referred to as the Axial Age. Fall offerings of the course are for incoming freshmen only. Co-requisite: ENGL 100 or 101. Transfer students wanting to take an introductory level, non-U.S. history course in the fall semester are advised to take HIST 211.

Hours
3

(F, S) As part of the Humanities sequence and the sequel to HIST 110, this course examines the role of religion in the maintenance of Roman, Christian, and Islamic empires, with particular attention to religiously inspired art, architecture and literature. The course begins with an examination of the rise of the Roman Empire and proceeds to examine the Christian transformation of that empire from Constantine through the Middle Ages. The primary focus is "Christendom" in Western Europe with limited attention to developments in the Byzantine Empire. The rise and spread of Islam is also examined, with special attention given to the interaction between Christian and Muslim civilization.. The course ends with examination of forces that challenge the medieval political-religious establishment in Western Europe in the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 101 and HIST 110. Co-requisite: ENGL 102.

Hours
3

(F, S) A study of such topics in global history as the building and maintenance of empire, colonization and de-colonization, impact of industrialization and secularization on societies around the world, nationalisms and revolutionary movements, and religious and ideological antagonisms (e.g., Islam and the West). The reading and interpretation of primary sources of historical information receives special attention. Course may be taken for credit more than once provided that the topic of the course is different each time it is taken.

Hours
3

(S) Gathering and criticism of data; bibliographies and aids; problems in historiography, composition analysis, and the final monograph. Regardless of the monograph topic chosen by the student, this course does not count toward either the United States or non-United States requirement within the major. This course must be taken in conjunction with another history course.

Hours
2

(F, S) As part of the Humanities sequence and the sequel to HUMN 112, this course begins with an examination of the Reformation, Catholic Counter-Reformation, and the religious wars in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. Attention then shifts to the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment and their impact on society and culture, with particular attention to the rise of revolutionary ideologies and conflicts in England, France, and America. Requirements include papers and oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and HUMN 112. Co-requisite: HUMN 211.

Prerequisites: HUMN112 and ENGL102
Hours
3

(F) An introduction to the history and culture of Spain and Portugal and serves as the foundation course for upper-level courses dealing with the history and culture of those regions and Latin America. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

(F) An overview of the history of Latin America from the colonial period to the present day. (Odd Years Only).

Hours
3

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