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(S) Current issues in the organization and administration of health care delivery systems in secondary, collegiate, professional, corporate, clinical, and inudstrial settings. Prerequisite: admittance into the professional component of the program through formal application or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(F) Practical applications of advanced techniques related to rehabilitation concepts.

Hours
3

(F) Advanced opportunities to gain practical clinical skills and experiences for athletic training majors. Course will include integration of knowledge and skills from previous Athletic Training courses as well as review and evaluation of assigned NATA proficiencies.

Hours
2

(F) Advanced opportunities to gain practical clinical skills and experiences for athletic training majors. Course will include integration of knowledge and skills from previous Athletic Training courses as well as review and evaluation of assigned NATA proficiencies.

Hours
2

(F) Current medical topics relevant to athletic trainers will contribute to the knowledge and competency that an entry-level athletic trainer should possess to recognize specific medical conditions and athletic injuries. This course will be taught by athletic training faculty and allied health professionals.

Hours
3

(F) Introduces the basic principles of pharmacology. Focus will be on providing information relating to drugs: historical perspectives, drub absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. Additional topics to be explored include, but are not limited to, legal and ethical considerations in drug therapy, drugs in sports, and alternative medicine regimes.

Hours
3

(S) Course will include discussions of topics relevant to NATA certification examination. Students will complete practice oral and written practice tests. This culmination of the supervised clinical experience will afford the athletic training student the opportunity to prepare and present a case study that presents the clinical experience. These presentations will follow the recommended abstract format for the NATA.

Hours
3

(S) Basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics, illustrations of applications in the fields of sociology, psychology, business, education, and natural science.

Hours
3

(F) Techniques and philosophies of behavioral science research including experiemental, quasi experimental, survey, evaluation, field, and unobtrusive designs for the collection and interpretation of information.

Hours
3

This course is an introductory study of the human body, including the basic structure and function of the tissues and major organ systems including; integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, urinary, digestive, respiratory, endocrine, immunity, circulatory, reproductive systems, genetics, human evolution, and conservation, the effects of diet, exercise, stress and environmental changes on human health. This course may not count towards the major but may fulfill the natural science requirement. Three credit hours, no lab.

Hours
3

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the biological and behavioral aspects of human sexuality with biological emphasis. Contemporary research addressing such issues as communication, love, relationships, sexual problems, therapies, pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and childbirth are discussed. Three credit hours, no lab.

Hours
3

(F, S) An introduction to the principles of modern biology including: biological chemistry, cell biology, modern and classical genetics, cellular energetics, ecology, and evolution.

Hours
3

(F, S) Optional laboratory to accompany Biology 109 which is a pre- or co-requisite to this lab. No credit will be given for this course without simultaneous or prior completion of BIOL 109.

Hours
1

(F, S) A course emphasizing general concepts of modern biology for majors and non-majors. Topics surveyed include cell biology, bioenergetics, molecular and Mendelian genetics, reproduction, development, evolution and ecology. Laboratory work is included. This course is a prerequisite to all other courses in biology. Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry; ACT Natural Science score of 25 or higher recommended for freshmen.

Hours
4

(on demand) The study of the specialized terminology of medical science. Recommended for pre-professional students, allied health students, and students in other health-related fields. Those seeking secondary certification cannot count this course toward certification requirements. This course does not meet the biological science requirement for teacher education.

Hours
2

(S) A survey of the animal kingdom with emphasis on physiological systems and diversity. Prerequisite: Biology 111.

Prerequisites: BIOL111
Hours
4

(F) A survey of the organisms which possess cell walls including: Protoctista, Fungi, and especially the Plants. Emphasis is given to ecological and economic importances, morphology, and evolutionary relationships. The course also involves a brief review of cell structure and cell energetics. Prerequisite: Biology 111.

Prerequisites: BIOL111
Hours
4

This is a foundation course designed in collaboration with nursing and other health sciences. Students will be introduced to classification, morphology, physiology, and genetics of the bacteria, fungi, viruses, and other microorganisms, as well as their role in nature, health, and industry. The course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisites: Biol 101, 109, or 111; Chem 212 or 230.

Hours
4

(S) An anatomical study of the tissues, organs, and organ systems of vertabrates with emphasis on human anatomy. Laboratory work primarily involves detailed dissection of a vertebrate such as the cat, study of the human skeleton, and microscopic examination of vertabrate tissues.

Hours
4

(F) A study of the functioning of the human organ systems with normal and clinical considerations. Prerequisites: CHEM 121 and 122.

Prerequisites: CHEM121 and CHEM122, or CHEM230
Hours
4

(on demand) An introduction to the classification, morphology, physiology, and genetics of the bacteria, fungi, viruses, and micrometazoans, as well as their roles in nature, health, and inudstry. Laboratory work stresses techniques for the culture and identification of micro-organisms. A portion of the course is devoted to immunology. Prerequisites: BIOL 111, CHEM 121 & 122. BIOL 361 is highly recommended (on demand).

Prerequisites: BIOL111 and CHEM121 and CHEM122
Hours
4

(F) The study of the processes by which genes and chromosomes are transmitted from parent organisms to offspring and from one unrelated organism to another. It is also an introduction to the genetic composition of populations and the changes in genetic composition of populations as they undergo Darwinian evolution.

Hours
4

(S) The study of the molecular structure of genes and chromosomes, and the molecular mechanisms of gene function (protein synthesis), replication, repair, regulation, and transposition. The genetic control of embryological development is also addressed and an introduction to genomics is provided.

Hours
4

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