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(S) Introduction to the basic skills and techniques required for safe and enjoyable river and lake travel by canoe and kayak. Prerequisite: RECM 130 or permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: RECM130
Hours
1

(S) Designed to deliver a comprehensive overview of Outdoor Recreation in the United States. It explores the full range of the outdoor recreation movement, from its underlying philosophical and social underpinnings to its rich history to the current providers of the diverse outdoor recreation opportunities which exist. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

(F) This course introduces the student to ropes and challenge courses, rappelling, rock climbing, cave exploration and backcountry recreation both in theory and practical application. Students will learn to plan, organize and lead various exercises.

Prerequisites: RECM130
Hours
3

(F) This course explores backcountry travel and living, particularly in the context of extended expeditions. Topics covered include hiking, backpacking, backcountry nutrition, trip planning and low impact/leave no trace camping. Of necessity, the course will also deal to varying degrees with wilderness leadership, ethics and land-use policies. Depending upon the interests and preferences of the members of the class, the course may delve into specific skills needed for multi-day backcountry excursions involving water travel, bicycle touring, horse packing and extreme-environment travel. (Odd Years Only).

Prerequisites: RECM130
Hours
3

(F) The program is what recreation is about. This course will cover the program planning and delivery process as a logical problem solving system covering needs analysis, population identification, design, implementation and program evaluation.

Hours
3

(S) The course will cover the recreation programming process from the working programmer's perspective. Students will study the work of professionals in the field, and will plan and deliver programs for the Union colege community.

Hours
3

(F) Examining the social-psychological principles at work when people recreate in the outdoors. This course is essentially the study of recreation and leisure behavior as it impacts the planning, design and management of natural resource-based recreation opportunities. Special consideration will be given to the effect of human behavior on natural environments. Prerequisites: RECM 111 and 201 or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(S) The study of leadership techniques and applications necessary for the delivery of recreation programs in a variety of leisure settings.

Hours
3

(F) Provide students with an in depth understanding of the day-to-day operations of leisure service facilities. Encompassing topics from design, daily operations, systems maintenance, to outsourcing critical tasks, the course will prepare students to manage and operate recreation, leisure service, and other similar multi-purpose facilities. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

(F) This course covers a number of basic park planning and landscape design principles. Attention will be given to the interaction between the visitor and the park; program delivery, design practicality including maintenance implications and the client/user group-dependent design process. Prerequisites: RECM 111 and 201 or permission of instructor. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

(F) Study of the historical, philosophical and legislative background for the development and management of our national system of wilderness and other protected lands. Inherent in this study is knowledge of ecosystems, basic wilderness management principles and visitor behavior. Prerequisite: RECM 333 and upper division status; or permission of instructor. (Odd Years Only).

Hours
3

(F) This course covers the basic principles of interpretation/education in the natural setting that contribute to the leisure experience and as part of natural and cultural resource management. Communication, educational and media skills will be demonstrated through instructor and student organized applications. Prerequisite: upper division status or permission of instructor. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

(S) This course provides the basis for the comprehension of the core principles and concepts necessary to manage the financial affairs of public and nonprofit recreation management organizations. Prior completion of ACTG 272, Financial Accounting, as an elective is strongly recommended. Prequisite: RECM 322 and upper division status; or permission of instructor. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

(F) A comprehensive introduction to the process of planning natural resource areas for recreation use. Special attention will be given to the decision-making process involved in managing lands held in the public domain. Techniques used to handle the concerns of multiple constituencis will be addressed through selected case studies. Prerequisite: RECM 333 and upper division status; or permission of instructor. (Odd Years Only).

Hours
3

(S) A survey of the techniques and procedures for conducting various forms of recreation survey research. This course will examine both qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques. Additionally, students will be expected to illustrate their understanding of assorted statistical methods. Prior completion of BHSC 245 Basic Statistics, as an elective is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: RECM 333 and upper division status or permission of instructor. (Odd Years Only).

Hours
3

(S) A discussion-based course, in which a thorough review of past and present issues relevant to the field of recreation management is covered. May be repeated for credit as long as the topics are different. Prerequisite: upper division status and permission of instructor. (on demand).

Hours
3

(S) The course explores the procedures and problems of recreation area and park operation with an emphasis on planning and management using NRPA best maintenance practices and standards to achieve operational efficiency. Students will: know how to develop an efficient and comprehensive maintenance management program in a park system; know how to organize and implement weekly, monthly and annual maintenance schedules; and become familiar with specialized maintenance equipment and maintenance tracking and scheduling software. Prerequisite: RECM 201 and upper division status; or permission of instructor. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

(S) As environmental education becomes more prevalent in public recreation management, professionals in the field must be prepared to intgrate a new bundle of learning objectives into their recreation plans. This course combines theory and application, from discussing the origins of environmental education to putting into practice assorted techniques, strategies and lesson plans for multiple environmental educatin programs. Prerequisite: upper division status or permission of instructor. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

(S) A career in recreation management is one of magnificent responsibilities and rewards. Developing a professional philosophy is a necessity for a fulfilling career. At the heart of recreation management are the philosophical ideals of excellence, care, equity and respect for self and to others. Prerequisite: Senior status, a minimum GPA of 2.5 in a minimum of 24 hours of RECM classes; or permission of the instructor. (On Demand).

Hours
3

(F) Environmental ethics is a principled attempt to redefine the boundaries of ethical obligation. This class will introduce the student to a wide range of environmental ethical theories and philosophies. Designed as a "Taking Sides" course, discussions will center on current major environmental issues emphasizing an examination of all relevant positions. Prerequisite: upper division status or permission of instructor. (Even Years Only).

Hours
3

Provides the foundation for student understanding of the conceptual underpinnings of the public funding of recreation opportunities. It will explore traditional revenue sources in their historic context and examine philosophical arguments driving the adoption of market-based funding and delivery. The public budgeting process (including the development and adoption process, implementation, and use as a policy tool) will be examined in detail. In addition, the course will explore public funding alternatives and issues.

Hours
3

(F, S, Sum) Supervised recreational internship in an outdoor/park setting for either 180 or 360 hours of practical and related work experience which occurs no sooner than two semesters prior to graduation. Application shall be made by mid-term of the preceding semester. Prerequisite: minimum 2.5 grade point average in RECM coursework.

Hours
6

(F) The course examines the role of religion in moral formation and community service (service to society by self-defined groups). Primary attention is given to the wisdom and prophetic traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Issues of social justice are a central point of focus, and limited attention is given to contemporary figures in whose voices are heard echoes of the prophetic traditions. Students develop the ability to interpret sacred texts of these religions in relation to the social location of the ancient audiences as well as their own. To this end, a service learning project is required of all students. On the basis of the service experience and directed reflection upon it (individual and collective reflective), students will critically examine the role of religion in shaping conceptions of justice for individuals and communities.

Hours
2

(F) A study of selected writings of the Hebrew Bible, Apocrypha, and New Testament with particular attention to the historica development of religious faith and practice in ancient Israel from earliest times to the rise of Christianity. The use and interpretation of Hebrew religious tradition in Islam is also examined. Students are introduced to various scholarly methods of biblical interpretation.

Hours
3

(S) An introduction to the academic study of religion through an examination of the relationship between religion and culture in the world's major religious traditions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Possible topics of focus include religious law and ethics, varieties of religious experience, and role of geography in the rise and spread of the major religions.

Hours
3

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