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This survey course is designed to acquaint students with all types of exceptional children including the physically and mentally disabled, socially and emotionally disturbed, and the gifted and talented as well as methods of adapting education to meet the needs of these children.

Hours
3

This course is designed to provide a general overview of current models of educationa for disabled infants and preschoolers in self-contained, mainstreamed or home setting.

Hours
3

This course will help students study and apply theories and procedures currently utilized in the field of special education for the educational management of students with emotional/behavioral disabilities. Prerequisite: SPED 501.

Hours
3

This course provides students with methods and materials for infusing career education for the mildly disabled (K-12).

Hours
3

This comprehensive survey course will examine characteristics, current theories, advanced strategies, and teaching methods developed for planning and implementing individualized program interventions for children who exhibit learning and behavior problems. Students will design, implement, evaluate and summarize a single-subject research plan suitable for presentation. Four separate major areas of study will be offered: A. Low Incidence Disorders and Conditions: B. Developmental Delay and Intellectual Disabilities; C. Behavioral and Emotional Disturbance and Mental Illness; and D. Autism Spectrum Disorders, Communication, and Language Disorders. One of four course topics may be taken per semester.

Hours
3

This course will help students learn and apply assessment procedures for children with learning disorders in academic and social behavior areas. Emphasis will be placed on the use of various informal and formal assessment methods. Prerequisites: SPED 501 and SPED 503.

Hours
3

This course is designed to help students study educational procedures designed to develop skills in diagnosing and prescribing educational strategies for children with learning and behavioral problems. Prerequisite: SPED 511.

Hours
3

This course will present an overview of instructional strategies and teaching methods in addition to providing experiences in planning and implementing individualized programs for children who exhibit learning and behavioral problems.

Hours
3

(F, S) This course is an introduction to the helping professions, with a particular emphasis on the nature of generalist social work practice. Content includes professional values and ethics, theoretical orientations, social and economic justice, diverse populations, and human services delivery philosophies and settings. A 15 hour service-learning experience in a human service organization is required of all students. Prerequisite: Open to all students. Counts toward the Liberal Education Core, Social & Behavioral Sciences' Paradigms and Individuals Disciplines.

Hours
3

This course will provide an introduction to the methods and tools of qualitative analysis and writing. Course material will include training in qualitative research, emphasizing interviewing, oral history collection, and historiography. Students will also have the opportunity to examine ethical issues related to historical writing, research, and presentation of materials. In additiion, the course will cover the basic skills needed to conduct historical research, including locating, using, and evaluating sources, and will explore how such work can shape and inform community development initiatives at the local level. Readings will be assigned regarding qualitative methods as well as community development. Students will also be trained in oral history collection. Each student will be required to collect at least one oral history for this course.

Hours
3

(F) This course provides an overview of contemporary social work practice by examining its history, philosophy, knowledge base, values and ethics, skills, and fields of practice with diverse populations; it examines the historical development and contemporary issues of the nation's social welfare system within a global context; and introduces the generalist model of social work practice, which serves as a base for subsequent social work courses. The course also contains an agency service learning experience of 20 clock hours.

Hours
3

(F) This course will provide students with an in-depth examination of the theoretical perspectives of the social work profession focusing on systems theory, the ecological perspective, the empowerment perspective, strentghs-based perspective, and the resiliency model. Individual growth and development (physical, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual) across the lifespan will be examined, along with the impact of diversity, such as age, gender, race, culture, upon individual and family functioning. Family will be explored from a functional, structural, and lifespan perspective, as well as the interactional processes and communication patterns within the family. Prerequisite: open to any student with junior standing, or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(S) This course provides knowledge and understanding of macro theories, research, and issues of human interactions in, between, and among groups, institutions, organizations, and communities. Emphasis is placed on understanding how diversity in age, class, color, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, and socio-economic circumstances contribute to and influence human behavior within the macro environment; specific attention will be given to the patterns and consequences of discrimination and oppression. Prerequisites: SWRK 318, or permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: SWRK318
Hours
3

(F) This course is designed to present basic knowledge and skills for social work practice with individuals utilizing the problem-solving method, systems and strengths perspectives. Emphasis will be on developing interviewing skills and the knowledge and skills necessary to employ the planned change steps in the helping process (problem identification/assessment, contracting, intervention, evaluation, and termination). Prerequisite: limited to students designated as pre-social work majors, completion of cognate courses, or permission of instructor. Pre- or co-requisite: SWRK 318.

Hours
3

(F) This course is designed to increase social workers' and human service workers' awareness of losses that affects individuals, families and communities and how to supportively respond to those who are experiencing loss. Also students will be given an opportunity to examine their own feelings regarding loss and ways to more effectively deal with personal losses. Theoretical perspectives of loss and grief will be explored, emphasizing integration of theory with "real" experiences. Prerequisite: open to any student with junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(F) This course will focus on professionalism through written and oral discourse. Students will learn how to conduct interviews across client systems (individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities), in order to aid in problem identification and selection of interventions, how to present informatin (both oral and written) in professional settings, and how to communicate with various constituents. Prerequisite: SWRK 233, or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(S) This course presents the basic elements of research design and methodology. Students learn how to formulate problems and hypothesis, draw samples, use standardized instruments, develop questionnaires and scales for data collection, and understand how statistics aid in data analysis; evaluating one's own practice, particularly through single-subject design. Respect for diversity, multicultural biases, and social and economic justice will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BHSC 245 , or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(S) This course is designed to present basic knowledge and skills for social work practice with families and small groups utilizing the problem solving method, systems and strengths perspectives. Emphais will be on problem identification/assessment, contracting, intervention, evaluation, and termination. Prerequisite: Swrk 325, Admission to Social Work Major, or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(F) This course provides the content and format for students to explore and develop an understanding of the social service needs in rural health care. Special attention to enhance student learning will be given to the needs of culturally diverse groups, ethinic groups, and populations-at-risk in a variety of health care situations in rural Central Appalachia. Prerequisite: open to any student with junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(S) This course provides the content and format for students to develop an understanding of the needs, concerns, issues, and service programs in a variety of rural areas for aging adults and their families, with rural Central Appalachia as the living laboratory. Prerequisite: open to any student with junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(S) This course examines the social welfare system as it affects the needs of children and families in contemporary American society and specifically in Central Appalachia. Various topics will be explored such as: family preservation, family violence, services and programs to address family social needs, and financial and public health programs that address child and family needs in rural Appalachia. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(F) This course is designed to provide entry-level theory, knowledge, research, values, and skills for generalist social work practice with organizations and communities. Foundation practice knowledge, values, and skills are expanded to include: community assessment; program planning, implementation and evaluation; community organizing; advocacy; agency management; and grant writing. Prerequisite: SWRK 337, or permission of instructor.

Hours
3

(F) This course examines historical and contemporary social welfare issues relative to social work practice. Students will be presented a range of policy practice skills that can be used to influence policy development in legislative, administrative, community, political, and economic arenas. The course has an experiential component in which students will use policy practice skills, focusing on how to utilize social and economic principles, to benefit populations-at-risk. Prerequisite: SWRK 337 or permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: SWRK337
Hours
4

This course is designed to present basic knowledge and skills for social work practice with groups, communities, and organizations utilizing the problem solving method, systems and strengths perspectives. Emphasis will be on problem identification/assessment, contracting, intervention, evaluation and termination. Prerequisites: Swrk 321, Swrk 325, and Swrk 333 and admission to the major.

Hours
3

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